Wednesday, January 25, 2012

found

These drawings have accumulated and gathered in my studio.






Thursday, January 19, 2012

Sidewalk Alchemy News

I wanted to give an update as to the current state of the Sidewalk Alchemy series that I had begun while in residence last year. I’ve continued to work on and develop this project for close to a year after the residency has ended and the images below show various large and smaller scale iterations of the project, which involves using photography to document random patterns created by chewing gum on Newark’s sidewalks, re-examining familiar and overlooked relationships between social interactions and physical spaces. Gold leaf has been applied by hand, to each print, bringing attention to the less visible chewing gum remnants—memorializing these varied and complex examples of collective mark-making.

Also I wanted to share a link to an art related radio show broadcast on WVKR, the radio station out of Vassar College. I had an opportunity to meet up The Dead Hare Radio Hour co-hosts Chris Albert and Matthew Slaats, during the taping of episodes 27 and 29, to discuss some of the ideas behind the Sidewalk Alchemy Project begun at Gallery Aferro. Podcast episodes can be accessed online at: http://deadhareradiohour.com/






Chewing gum patterns, horizontal sidewalk joints, and gold leaf. 5 feet x 10 feet




Chewing gum patterns, vertical sidewalk joints, and gold leaf. 5 feet x 10 feet




Chewing gum patterns, diagonal sidewalk joints, and gold leaf. 5 feet x 10 feet



Framed series with diagonals. 22 inches x 55 inches


Framed series with horizontals and verticals. 22 inches x 55 inches



An installation detail.



An installation shot from my studio in Beacon.


Sunday, January 15, 2012

Know your rights!

From the ACLU: photographer's rights. Because it is often sort of hard in NJ to avoid photographing something connected with infrastructure, even if you're not trying to.

Friday, January 13, 2012

3 minute spot_THE CHINESE PAINTING (performance - first set)

3 minute spot_THE CHINESE PAINTING (performance - first set) from Jomar Statkun on Vimeo.


THE CHINESE PAINTING:

A Distinguishable Moment within an Infinitesimal

Increment in a Variable


1. An original abstract oil on canvas is

painted by the artist Jomar Statkun.


2. A photograph is taken of the abstract painting

using an image analyzing program. The program

analyzes the abstract painting and tries to find

its image on the internet.


3. As the program naturally cannot find

the exact image of the abstract painting, it

proposes similar images based on color,

composition, texture, and other visual data.


4. These proposed images are collected along

with their accompanying websites.


5. A selection of the proposed images are then

emailed to an oil painting reproduction factory

in Xiamen City, Fujian Province, China. There

the proposed images are made into hand

painted oil on canvas reproductions.


6. These oil on canvas reproductions are then

collected and photographed. They are then made

into black and white halftone images for

silkscreen printing.


7. In addition to being printed, these halftone

images are imported into a program that

converts images into sound.


8. The artist Jomar Statkun acts as MC and

manipulates the sound.


9. Invited performers interact with the sound.


10. The viewer is welcome to take pictures of the

hand painted oil on canvas reproductions and

to have their own made by the oil painting

factory in China.

(www.oilpaintingproducer.com)

FULL VIDEO: THE CHINESE PAINTING (performance - 1st set)_PART 1 of 2

THE CHINESE PAINTING (performance - 1st set)_PART 1 of 2 from Jomar Statkun on Vimeo.

FULL VIDEO: THE CHINESE PAINTING (performance - 1st set)_PART 2 of 2

THE CHINESE PAINTING (performance - 1st set)_PART 2 of 2 from Jomar Statkun on Vimeo.

video

For me, the creative process mirrors nature. There is always an experience of the cycle of renewal and destruction, a connection to environment, impermanence, and cause and effect. Here, I have the opportunity to explore this process in an undefined space, directly on the walls and floors with charcoal.

Wednesday, January 4, 2012

Read the comments too

An interesting article on the culture of borrowing (and the Richard Prince case)